A New Trainer’s Diary Regarding Scientific Conditioning

US bred gelding Times Ahead winning stakes handicap in Baden-Baden, Germany at 20-1

Finally another perspective on the subject other than mine, this time from a brand new 22yo veterinary student-turned-trainer with but a one horse stable – his first 8 starts: 2-3-2 and $25k in German prize money. Not bad for this $4,200 auction purchase with a past record of 5 starts and just $350 in purses earned. Oh, and he also showed up lame after arriving at the farm. I’ll shut up now as promised.

In his own words….

Introduction

Over the last six or seven years, I’ve been involved in the magnificent sport of thoroughbred racing. How to condition these animals to their maximum potential has always been my primary interest. In these years I observed a lot of trainers and practically every single one of them claims their methods are better than anyone else’s, some say it out loud, others just imply it. They will tell you they train differently from anyone else. They will tell you they have the mysterious, so-called “edge”. It took me all those years, up until just a couple of months ago, to find out this is just plain bullshit.

Firstly, the methods of these trainers may look different from time to time, but in 90 percent of the cases they aren’t, because they depend almost solely on the natural ability of the equine athlete.

Secondly, the “edge” one can have can only come from conditioning your equine athletes beyond their natural ability, it’s called exercise physiology and it makes the mysterious “edge” not so mysterious after all.

About me: My name is Bart Hermans,  I’m 22 years old and live in Boxmeer, the Netherlands, though my horse races predominantly in Germany. I study veterinary medicine at the University of Ghent, Belgium. I obtained my training license at the beginning of this year and so far I had eight starts (all in the last 4 months). All eight starts were PP’s with 2 wins, 3 second places and 2 third places obtaining about $25,000(which is quite a lot for German racing).

I write this article, because I think it is a very good example of how the conventional training of my horse turned into a form of semi-scientific training with good success. Above all, I hope those who read this will benefit from it, and others, in turn, will benefit from them.

Buying the horse and starting training

The story with this horse starts about a year ago, when my father and I went to the Newmarket HIT-Sales, to buy the first horse I would train on my own. We decide to look for a low priced, lightly raced 3 year old maiden, who has showed some capabilities. Because of the lower quality of racing in Germany it normally is possible for such a horse to break its maiden over here. For just $4200 we came home with a lovely looking, US-bred colt, by the name “Times Ahead”. He had previously raced five times and came in fourth once, earning a staggering $350.

I decided to geld the colt for practical reasons and to give him some time off, because after a few days he showed lameness and the clinic wasn’t able to find any obvious cause. Three months later I started training, but within a couple of weeks he was lame again. At the clinic they found he had a chipped ankle in his hind limb, how this happened still is a mystery. After operation and revalidation I started training again, this time everything going well.

Race by race description of conditioning program

Race #

Date

Racecourse

Runners

Distance

Race type

Purse

1

07-10-‘11

Duindigt,NL

7

6f

Handicap

$2000

Race preview:  At this point my horse went through conventional training for 12 weeks, doing  1.25 miles of galloping and half a mile of trotting each day. Half a mile breezes went down every 7 to 8 days. Basically the same training as every other racehorse in the nation. In the preparation to his first start I encountered no problems, despite the horse always having an off gait. After the sixth breeze or so, my jockey friend tells me he’s dead fit and should race. Two breezes later I decide to enter him in a handicap race at Duindigt, The Netherlands. He is rated at 51kg, the Dutch standard for horses entering handicap races for the first time, which is fairly low.  On the racecard of that day are two options, a 9f handicap or this race. Normally 9f would be better, but there are a lot more runners in that race. Since the overall quality of Dutch racing is ridiculously low, I see the horse winning both events easily. So I enter him in the 6f race to give him a quiet race, with just a couple of runners.

Race discussion:  He finishes second… He loses to a 10 year old by 1.5 lengths, who managed to earn $1900 in the last three years. The jockey tells me the horse ran a good race. A couple of hours after the race I realize: If this is a good race for the horse, he won’t be able to break his maiden in higher-level Germany. Something has to change!

Earnings: $550

Race #

Date

Racecourse

Runners

Distance

Race type

Purse

2

08-06-‘11

Mülheim,GER

14

8f

Conditions

$4000

Race preview:  For a couple of months now, I have been reading Bill Pressey’s blog and have been doing some research to the scientific side of conditioning racehorses, also I read a few books on equine exercise physiology. Up to this point I didn’t do anything with the new found information and was relying solely on what I saw other trainers do, but something had to change, remember?  I start by giving the horse four weeks off of racing and to use this time to up the ante of my conditioning program.  I make some radical changes: firstly, increasing the daily gallops to 1.5 miles with the last 3f done in about 0:15 to 0:16 sec/furlong. Secondly, and most importantly, workdays are performed once every 4 to 5 days, consisting of a 7f work in about 0:15 sec/furlong and a 5f breeze in about 0:12 to 0:13 sec/furlong with a 5 to 7 minute walk in between. The horse takes this major increase in workload very well and after a few weeks he feels better than ever before. I decide to enter the horse in a conditions race in Germany against considerably better stock.

Race discussion:  He finishes second… But this time he doesn’t lose to a 10 year old goat, he loses to a 6 year old again by 1.5 lengths, who just last year was fourth in a listed race (and winner of a $27,000 race in 2009), in a field much more crowded as well. A horse at least 50 pounds better than the winner of his previous race! This is more like it…

Earnings: $1100

Race #

Date

Racecourse

Runners

Distance

Race type

Purse

3

08-21-‘11

Düsseldorf,GER

13

7f

Conditions

$5400

Race preview:  The horse is on a tight schedule now, I want to race him every 14 days. Because I’m satisfied with his last performance, I won’t change much.  I only increase his daily gallops by another quarter of a mile, because I feel he can easily handle it, also I perform two workdays before his next start in 14 days. The upcoming race, his first at a premium German track, is slightly easier than his last race, so I see a good chance of passing the wire first!

Race discussion:  Woohooo…!  It’s a great feeling to see hard work pay off like this, as he wins the race comfortably, by 1.25 lengths over the horse coming in second and another 7 lengths to the horse coming in third, leading a shredded field.

Earnings: $3300

Race #

Date

Racecourse

Runners

Distance

Race type

Purse

4

09-03-‘11

Baden-Baden,GER

17

9f

Stakes

Handicap

$24400

Race preview:  After winning the last race the horse is awarded a German rating of 66kg (in comparison this is about 25kg/55lbs higher than his last rating in the handicap race in the Netherlands).  At the country’s most prestigious racetrack Baden-Baden, is a stakes handicap coming up in two weeks. This race is by far the toughest race up till now, so I have to toughen up his conditioning as well. The longer distance of 9f will suit him better, because he has built up great stamina in the past weeks, but I fear it’s not enough.  I increase the daily gallops to two miles, both intervals at workdays are increased to a mile at 0:15 sec/furlong and a 6f breeze at 0:12 to 0:13 sec/furlong. I also add another trick I read about on this blog, two days before the race I perform a 2.5f blowout.  So this adds up to two races, two workdays and a blow-out in a 14 day window.

Race discussion:  Again, woohoo…!  He wins the race easily by 1.25 lengths, and the last 50 yards out the jockey stands upright to celebrate his win (see picture at beginning), it’s a brilliant ride, coming to the outside rail after the last turn. Hard conditioning pays off big time, not only for me, but also for bettors, as he pays 20/1!

Earnings:  $14300

Race #

Date

Racecourse

Runners

Distance

Race type

Purse

5

09-25-‘11

Cologne,GER

11

9f50y

Handicap

$12500

Race preview:  After last race, his rating is adjusted to 70kg, which is 9lbs higher. This rating will make it a lot more difficult to win another race. A day after the race I finally receive my long awaited HR/GPS equipment. Over the next few days I analyze every move I have made with this horse, by collecting data from a workday and a few daily gallops. I find out that, according to the data, he recovers amazingly quickly, even on a workday, which means his workload can easily be increased further. To increase his workload significantly, he would need some more time to adjust to the new conditioning program. The turf season ends in two months and not too many races are available, so for purely economical reasons I decide to just take baby steps. The only change I make is increasing his daily gallops again, this time to 2.25 miles. In the 21 days to his next race, I perform four workdays and a similar blow-out as last race. His next race is in Cologne, this time a normal handicap race (stakes handicaps are a rare occurrence here), at a premium track in Germany,  against similar stock as last time, but remember, this time he carries 9lbs extra.

Race discussion:  He comes in third by 2.25 lengths to the winner, he runs a good race, maybe he could have won, but the jockey makes the mistake of settling behind the favorite, who in his turn, settles in the back. The horse is a front runner, and speed is not Times Ahead’s no. 1 quality, its stamina, as I condition him for that.

Earnings:  $1400

Race #

Date

Racecourse

Runners

Distance

Race type

Purse

6

10-09-‘11

Baden-Baden,GER

12

10f

Handicap

$15200

Race preview:  I’m satisfied with the last performance. Because of economical reasons, as explained before, there is no time to increase the workload significantly, so I decide to change nothing in his conditioning program for the remainder of the season, just sitting back, watching him collect PP’s and if he wins he will retire for the season (his rating will go up 7 to 10lbs after a win, making it virtually impossible to win again this season). I can do this, because I know that next season I will have a better horse, because next year I can condition him further above the abilities he showed up to now. Still the horse will improve, because workdays are done before super=compensation is over (I’ll explain this later on).  Again it comes down to two races, two workdays and a blow-out in a 14 day window.  The next race is against better stock than ever before, but he carries a bottom weight.

Race discussion:  He comes in third by 1.5 lengths to the winner, again maybe he could have won, but he is pulling all the way because another horse tries to stick his nose up his butt for about 7f. It’s a good race anyway, showing he is a really consistent horse, willing to fight at any cost.

Earnings: $1700

Race #

Date

Racecourse

Runners

Distance

Race type

Purse

7

10-23-‘11

Düsseldorf,GER

12

10.5f

Handicap

$9400

Race preview:  I change nothing to the condition program, but one thing, I leave out the blow-out this time, as a test. It comes down to two races, two workdays in a 14 day window.  The next race is against the same stock as in his stakes handicap win, but this time we are carrying a top weight.

Race discussion:  A terrible race… He comes in fourth by six lengths to the winner. Literally everything goes wrong , he has to settle way back in the pack, 2f out the jockey almost has to pull him up, because some idiot wants to settle before him and like it isn’t enough he is stuck behind a slow horse until 1 ½  furlongs before the wire. To be honest, he probably couldn’t have won if it was a good race, though the horse finishing second by a nose, was beaten by him in Cologne in the same scale.

Earnings: $500

Race #

Date

Racecourse

Runners

Distance

Race type

Purse

8

11-06-‘11

Krefeld,GER

12

10f50y

Handicap

$7000

Race preview: All the premium tracks of Germany are closed up for the season. A nice race, though a lower purse, is coming up in Krefeld, a lovely track located just 40 miles from my home. Conditioning is the same as last race, but this time, I use the blow-out again, I don’t know why exactly, but it seems beneficial. For this race I use an apprentice jockey, because carrying 132lbs just seems too much in this race.

Race discussion:  He comes in second by a nose, drawn seven lengths clear of the rest of the field. The winner won his last race by seven lengths, so it’s no shame to lose to him. The race goes well, but the apprentice jockey finishes the horse terribly, but that’s probably why he’s got 9lbs allowance.

Earnings: $1700

Future Races

Race #

Date

Racecourse

Runners

Distance

Race type

Purse

9

11-26-‘11

Krefeld,GER

?

10f50y

Handicap

$7000

Race discussion: This will be his last race for this season, after this race day the turf season in Germany ends. Conditioning for this race will be the same as the last, and he will probably be a favorite for the race.

Why moves are made

To understand why the moves in this conditioning program are made, you need to look into the science of equine exercise physiology. Exercise physiology is quite simple, but most trainers will never incorporate it into their programs, so if you do, you’ll create a great edge.

Interval workouts: Interval workouts have many advantages over conventional workouts. In the rest periods between intervals, lactic-acid builds up and muscle fuel is depleted, this may sound as a bad thing, but because of this, the horse will learn to accommodate these stresses, meaning in a race he will be able to maintain high speeds for an extended period of time.  Also you can accomplish more work with your horse, because fatigue is avoided due to the rest periods and injuries will occur less (in comparison to doing the same amount of work in conventional workouts).

Working out more often:  Workout frequencies of every 7-8 days only maintain the fitness the horse already has developed. This is because you workout after super-compensation is gone. I tried to illustrate this with my superb paint-skills in a recovery/super-compensation cycle:

A sound horse will recover from a workout in approximately two days, after this point super-compensation kicks in, meaning the horse is actually fitter than it was before the workout, if you work out again after super-compensation is over, you will be doing nothing more than maintaining (or even losing) fitness. On the other hand, when working out every three to five days, before super-compensation is over, the only way to go is up. Of course this cycle will be longer in unfit horses and shorter in fit horses. Another reason to work out more often, are spiculated red blood cells. As you probably know, horses store about 30% of their red blood cells in their spleen, they are kept there until their flight mechanism kicks in (a workout). After a few days in the spleen the red blood cell will be dealing with acids, making it less efficient in transporting oxygen (via a spiculated red blood cell).

In nature and on pasture, horses tend to empty their spleen themselves, by performing a couple of sprints every few days, but they cannot do this when cooped up in a stall).

Longer daily gallops: Longer daily gallops are done for a couple of reasons, to draw fuel from the muscles, to create a denser net of capillaries in the muscles and to keep the horse calm. Drawing fuel from muscles is a good thing, as explained before. Creating a denser net of capillaries is beneficial because oxygen transport to the muscles will be more efficient. To be honest, the 2.25 miles of daily galloping, as performed by my horse, will not really induce this optimally, which is a point of improvement for next season.  As you can imagine, a sound horse on a conditioning program as described above, will feel very fit, very fast, all the time, so to be able to handle the horse in a orderly and quiet fashion you will need to calm him with these daily gallops.

Ending daily gallops fast: If you end your daily gallops in approximately 0:15 sec/furlong (slower for some, faster for others), you will be increasing so called cruising speed, thus delaying onset of fatigue, in this process you train at 80 to 90% of your horse’s maximum heart rate. You are training the horse to use lactic acid as an energy source.

Prerace Blow-outs: As explained before horses store around 30% of their red blood cells in their spleen, with a prerace blow-out, one or two days before the race, you ensure that on race day your horse has a fresh supply of acid-unaffected red blood cells. These red blood cells are better capable of transporting oxygen to the muscles.

Other factors that contribute to performance

Of course, besides conditioning, there are other factors that can improve performance. I wouldn’t refer to these factors as an edge, because they are practiced by loads of successful trainers. I will take just a few of these factors, and tell something about them.

Nutrition:  Feed your horse enough! It’s better to have a horse looking a little chubby, because that way they are able to store more useable energy than horses that are too thin. Thinner horses fatigue earlier, because the only energy they can use comes from their daily feedings. I like to feed a complete high-oil commercial feed, which is developed especially for racehorses. I rarely use supplements.

Horsemanship:  The most important factor besides conditioning. If you‘re not a horseman, you’re doomed as a trainer. Feeling for your horses is essential, if you lack this, you will create injuries and other problems, as well as not noticing these problems in time.

Riders: Riders should be able to keep horses calm at all times, if a horse is pulling he can’t be trained properly and is prone to injury.  In my experience, good riders are calm, well thinking and horsemen themselves.

Turnout: Though I have no evidence for this, I think it’s best to turn your horses out every day. If turned out every day, most horses remain calm in the paddock and will rarely come back injured, apart from the occasional scratch. I feel my horse performs better, because he’s turned out every day, he’s a happy horse.

Points of improvement:

To stay at the top of your game, you will constantly need to review every move you’ve made, otherwise you’ll lose your edge. Of course there are a lot of points that can be improved in my conditioning program. For next season, I have the following in mind:

Longer daily gallops: To build a denser network of capillaries, to draw more muscle fuel and to be able to deliver stronger workouts. I don’t know how much longer yet, but my guess would be somewhere around four miles a day.

Triple ladder intervals: At this point, I have a horse with great stamina, but he lacks proper speed. To increase both I’m thinking of starting triple intervals next season. Something like: a mile in 0:15-0:16 sec/furlong, 5 or 6f in 0:13-0:14 sec/furlong and a 3 or 4f in 0:11-0:12 sec/furlong. Note that such a workout can only be performed after a very extensive conditioning program.

HR/GPS: The use of HR/GPS equipment should be incorporated more. So far I’m focused at speed only, but heart rate versus speed, should give a better view of what I’m actually doing in a workout, and how it affects the fitness of my horse.

Taper: Because I start a more demanding conditioning program next season, I will have something to really taper back from, for a short period (for a big race, or to make more starts in a short period). Studies show that tapering back from a big workload can greatly enhance performance.

Suggested reading

Practically all knowledge I have about exercise physiology, comes from books and research papers. There are two books that in my opinion stood out above the rest:

The Fit Racehorse II, by Tom Ivers: This book was very helpful in understanding how much your equine athlete is able to handle. If you want to start interval training, this is a must-read, it helps you understand how everything works inside your horse, and why moves are made. Though, even in my opinion, the conditioning programs in this book, will be very hard on the horse and very difficult to achieve.

Equine Exercise Physiology, by Kathryn Nankervis and David MarlinThe bible of equine exercise physiology, very detailed and simple to understand. Everything you wish to know about the subject is in here.

Thanks for the running diary Bart, I couldn’t have said it better myself. Occasionally I get frustrated that my efforts to instill science and technology into a very traditional sport are going nowhere, then I hear from this gentleman halfway across the world and it gives me goosebumps.

Bart has never paid me a dime, nor asked me a single question during this process. He ordered his HR/GPS gear elsewhere and unbeknownst to me, was reading my inane ramblings on this blog for several months and gradually implementing these concepts into his training regimen. It just goes to show us that ego and money are the root of 90% of the problems in the thoroughbred world, and when that is taken out of the equation – the horse itself benefits immensely.

I am used to the criticisms that come along with blogging about this stuff, but Bart is not – so please consider his feelings in any comments that you may leave here. Although I can’t imagine anything other than ‘congratulations’ is in order, well… you just never know in this business.

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About bpressey

Equine Exercise Physiologist

Posted on November 16, 2011, in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink. 26 Comments.

  1. That was great to read, and congratulations Bart on a job well done. I’d love to find a trainer that was actively looking at outside the box types of training methods, but alas they’re in very short supply here.

    I wonder too if this type of training, coupled with a good warm up prior to the race rather then just walking from the paddock to the gate, would help with bleeding. Not only do you come out with a more fit athlete, but they come out prepared for the rigors of racing. There is a lot of discussion right now about Lasix, and I think one of the reasons they have fewer bleeders across the pond is because they warm their horses up. I of course have no scientific backing for that, but it just makes sense.

  2. Congrats to you Bart, and I for one await your 2012 dairy, Best wishes and success for yu and your horse(s)

  3. Congrats from me Bart. That’s awesome stuff and good luck for the future with your training. It is fascinating stuff and something I would love to have a go at myself.
    Melissa Turner
    (New Zealand )

  4. Barry Roberts (New Zealand)

    Great Stuff Bart. Having looked at your progress I expect that you will do even better next year.Some may be surprised at the distances you used in the long daily gallops for aerobic conditioning. A lot of people would say that a horse could not stand up to 2.25miles of this work, but in Australia it is common to start at say 1400metres and work up at 10% increases per week to even 2.5 miles(4000 metres) with mature horses in these sessions , while maintaining a lactic acid level between 4 and 6mmol/L, usually this is achieved for horses with a Heart Rate of 150 – 175 BPM depending on age and ability of the horse. Most trainers would not do this because they are scared that they could be doing damage to the horse. HR & GPS monitoring and Lactic acid testing is the Key to getting proper feedback to give us confidence to take the Scientific training to new levels. Congratulations to Bill too. Without your Scientific input and knowledge and you giving us the chance to Blog here with an exchange of ideas – No progress in training like this would be made.

  5. Well written, Bart! Best of luck to you next year!

  6. Excellent, excellent stuff. Well done Bart!

    If you could answer a couple of questions, based on your diary, I would be grateful and it will give me a better understanding:
    a) what speed are you travelling at when you are doing your 2.25 galloping miles per day?
    b) you mention ending your daily gallop in 15 second furlong – do you progressively move to that target or do you ask the horse to quicken solely in the last furlong or two?
    b) you mention using a high oil complete feed – what percentage of oil ? This is very interesting in that there are various views on a high oil diet – both pro’s and con’s. I did read a paper before which suggested an oil percentage of 8% allowed for increased glycogen storage in the muscle and performance but above certain levels (12% I think) performance dropped.

    I agree with paddock time. A neighbouring trainer found that when he trained his horses out (never stabled at all winter or summer) the horses were healthier.

    Keep up the good work and the 2012 diary will be something to look forward to!

  7. Thank you all, for the wonderful reactions!

    As for the questions:

    A: I travel around 20 to 22 seconds a furlong in the daily galopps.
    B: The last three furlongs the horse is asked to quicken to 15 seconds a furlong, but with a good rider, slowly accelerating over the last mile or so, might be a good option, in my opinion.
    C: The oil percentage is 8.5%, I feed Baileys No.10 Racehorse Mix. I made the decision for this feed upon the same paper, as well as experience with a friend, already feeding it for some time.

    • Thanks for the answers Bart.

      Re the feed – when I looked at all feeds available here in Ireland, I came to the conclusion that Baileys No.10 would be my choice if I wasn’t mixing my own. They were the only ones whoses website and commentary gave scientific reasoning for the inclusion of their high oil %

  8. 22 years old! Wow, Great read, Good luck

  9. Those who do not improve and simplify sources and methods will be forced out of business by the current, and I suspect, permanent “market correction.” It is refreshing to know of some who offer and use options other than the current snake nest. I suspect that small breeders would benefit from the heart monitors if they put their minds to adapting the method. I wish I could use more of these methods on my race birds. Interesting that optimum fat % is the same for racing pigeons. I use sunflower seed for fat and flax as an anti inflamatory to compensate for excessive omega six in sunflower oil. Lot of opportunity in research on anti-inflamatory feeding.

    • Jim I dont wish to go to far off subject here but I used to race pigeons with some very good men an often wonder if the breeding principles are the same with regard to hybrid vigor and crossing unrelated but inbreed lines. This probably isnt the place to discuss this but I may do some study.

      • Phillip, the reproductive math is different and so choices fewer with equines; but, yes, the principles are the same .

  10. Wonderful article! Congratulations, and good luck for the next years.

  11. This article is an absolute sensation. Bart: 22 and you own and train a black type winning horse, AND your doing vet science!!! I AM SO JEALOUS:) massive respect to you. As an aside, Times Ahead (USA) was trained in Newmarket by Peter Chapel Hyam – a trainer who has won the Derby twice(inc. Dr Devious who famously prepped for Epsom at Churchil Downs), the Italian Derby twice and a host of other European Classics & Group 1s. @Bart – how did you get your license so young? what country issues your license?

  12. another quick question Bart – how many horses could you train like this? Even if you were full time is it a max of two per rider per day? I am currently doing my diploma in stud farm management at Newmarket and will be moving to Germany upon completion. I would love an email contact for you.

    • Hi Alistair,

      Thank you very much for your wonderful reaction, I feel quite lucky myself! The stakes handicap he won, wasn’t a blacktype race. It was a so called premium handicap for horses competing in the same class. Though, if he improves enough next year, we might take a shot at becoming a black-type performer.

      As for your questions:

      – The Netherlands issued my license, It was a fairly easy proces, consisting of course of a couple of weeks and a practical and theoratical exam. It think it would be very much harder to obtain your licence in the UK though…

      – If I had the time to do this full-time and had staff members, I would be able to train four to five horses per staff member in eight hours a day. I could do four on my own. Five to six hours for riding and two to three hours for stable-duties and feeding. Horses would be turned out during stable duties and morningbreak. You are welcome to contact me at hermansb@gmail.com .

      What exactly are you going to do in Germany?

  13. Bart, thank you so much for the time you put into writing this post! I found a few points that I will take into account with my own conditioning program.

    I’m sure you will have an excellent next season! Best of luck! Please write an update post at some point!

  14. Gábor Reischl

    Bart ! Congratulation ! Hard and innovativ work creates the success !
    I have one question: during the conditioning program do You give any rest day to Your horse, or he is working fluently ?
    Good luck for the next season !

    • Hi Gabor,

      Didn’t notice your reply, but to answer your question: He only gets a rest day for practical reasons, like a sloppy track, time shortage or when there’s no decent rider available (usually occurs once every two weeks). Even the day after a race he goes out trotting, after workouts he receives a day of slow galloping and trotting for about 2 miles total. I believe it helps the horse recover far better from strenuous efforts. This is because the muscles are “flushed“ with blood and the capillaries are opened allowing all the “poisons“ that make the horse sore, to wash away.

      As for others enthusiasts of this post, in a couple of months you can expect a new one, regarding a 5-yo filly I got in training recently, shes going trough a somewhat altered updated conditioning program, I designed especially for her. I have high hopes she will improve a lot! She will probably run her first race for me in France, where in my opinion the level of racing (and conditioning) is utter world class.

  15. Hoi Bart,
    Klinkt allemaal heel goed! Maar ja ik ben een leek he! Maar als ik alle andere commentaren zie, ziet het er goed uit! 🙂 Proficiat en op naar een top 2012! groetjes Nicole

  16. I find your writing most interesting and wish to purchase your book. Currently, I am surveying 20 plus trainers at Gulfstream on the issue, and their individual ideas on EIPH. I have collected enough for a book to write.
    Thought I would see if you would wish to discuss my unique and up to date finds such as the fact that on opening Saturday at Gulfstream 2012, 42 horses bled as evidenced by just one of 4 track vets on the grounds. There is an answer for EIPH which my five year study with one trainer, and now over the past month, four trainers have proven. Give me a call 828 777 5558

  17. Very inspiring. Conditioning is the answer for competing with trainers and owners depending on the numbers game for success.

  18. two words for u bart LOVED IT

  1. Pingback: EIPH: If You’re not Breezing, You’re Bleeding | ThoroEdge Equine Performance

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  3. Pingback: Video Update: Times Ahead Racing in Belgium | ThoroEdge Equine Performance

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